Panasonic Lumix S PRO 24-70mm F2.8 Review

Panasonic Lumix S PRO 24-70mm F2.8 Review

Full-frame camera systems are quick to offer professional photographers the traditional holy trinity of f/2.8 lenses to cover most shooting scenarios; 14-24mm, 24-70mm and 70-200mm. The Panasonic Lumix S PRO 24-70mm F2.8 lens in this test is seen as a real all-rounder; wide enough for landscapes, close enough for portraits and a whole bunch of other stuff in between.

That trio of lenses is technically now available for the L-Mount that Panasonic S1 full-frame cameras use, although currently the 14-24mm f/2.8 lens is only available from Sigma. And unlike the stand alone 70-200mm f/2.8 that Panasonic launched at the end of 2019, Sigma also offers its own 24-70mm f/2.8 lens which we gave a firm five star rating earlier this year.

There was a mouth-watering £2,249 RRP at launch for Panasonic's 24-70mm lens, which is double the price of Sigma's version. From the offset we can be fairly sure that Panasonic's lens is exceptionally capable in every way, but is it a more enticing option than Sigma's cut price and highly-rated offering?

There was a mouth-watering £2,249 RRP at launch for Panasonic's 24-70mm lens, which is double the price of Sigma's version. From the offset we can be fairly sure that Panasonic's lens is exceptionally capable in every way, but is it a more enticing option than Sigma's cut price and highly-rated offering?

Given this is the only like-for-like clash of L-Mount zoom lenses between Panasonic and Sigma, we've provided a few extra specification comparisons for you in this test, although we have not run a real-world head to head. What we will say now though, is that the lens on test here will reward those with deep enough pockets, it's fantastic.

So is the Panasonic Lumix S PRO 24-70mm F2.8 missing a trick? Hardly. In place of a focusing mode switch, there is a lovely focus clutch. You pull back the focus clutch at the front end of the lens barrel to switch into manual focus, with focus distances marked on the barrel.

It's an easy action to switch between focus modes - you won't even need to take your eye away from the viewfinder. The focus clutch is a huge draw to this lens and perhaps the single biggest plus over the Sigma lens.

Panasonic Lumix S PRO 24-70mm F2.8 Review

Panasonic Lumix S PRO 24-70mm F2.8 Review

Full-frame camera systems are quick to offer professional photographers the traditional holy trinity of f/2.8 lenses to cover most shooting scenarios; 14-24mm, 24-70mm and 70-200mm. The Panasonic Lumix S PRO 24-70mm F2.8 lens in this test is seen as a real all-rounder; wide enough for landscapes, close enough for portraits and a whole bunch of other stuff in between.

That trio of lenses is technically now available for the L-Mount that Panasonic S1 full-frame cameras use, although currently the 14-24mm f/2.8 lens is only available from Sigma. And unlike the stand alone 70-200mm f/2.8 that Panasonic launched at the end of 2019, Sigma also offers its own 24-70mm f/2.8 lens which we gave a firm five star rating earlier this year.

There was a mouth-watering £2,249 RRP at launch for Panasonic's 24-70mm lens, which is double the price of Sigma's version. From the offset we can be fairly sure that Panasonic's lens is exceptionally capable in every way, but is it a more enticing option than Sigma's cut price and highly-rated offering?

There was a mouth-watering £2,249 RRP at launch for Panasonic's 24-70mm lens, which is double the price of Sigma's version. From the offset we can be fairly sure that Panasonic's lens is exceptionally capable in every way, but is it a more enticing option than Sigma's cut price and highly-rated offering?

Given this is the only like-for-like clash of L-Mount zoom lenses between Panasonic and Sigma, we've provided a few extra specification comparisons for you in this test, although we have not run a real-world head to head. What we will say now though, is that the lens on test here will reward those with deep enough pockets, it's fantastic.

So is the Panasonic Lumix S PRO 24-70mm F2.8 missing a trick? Hardly. In place of a focusing mode switch, there is a lovely focus clutch. You pull back the focus clutch at the front end of the lens barrel to switch into manual focus, with focus distances marked on the barrel.

It's an easy action to switch between focus modes - you won't even need to take your eye away from the viewfinder. The focus clutch is a huge draw to this lens and perhaps the single biggest plus over the Sigma lens.